lifeblood: listlogs: 1998v01n009-news


ig-news-digest          sunday, march 1 1998          volume 01 : number 009


                               today's subjects:
                               -----------------
  [ig-news] ig in sydney, feb 27 1998       [sherlyn koo <sherlyn@fl.net.au>]
  [ig-news] ig in the age, feb 20 1998      [sherlyn koo <sherlyn@fl.net.au>]
  [ig-news] ig article in the west australian, feb 27, 1998  [jodi <joadster]


----------------------------------------------------------------------


date: sat, 28 feb 1998 22:39:02 +1100
from: sherlyn koo <sherlyn@fl.net.au>
subject: [ig-news] ig in sydney, feb 27 1998


[sherlyn's note: another self-indulgent concert review by me.]

hey again everyone,


here's the set list for last night's show at the state theatre in
sydney:


1. shame on you
2. least complicated
3. tried to be true
4. the wood song
5. hey kind friend
6. it's alright
7. dead man's hill
8. get out the map
9. shed your skin
10. power of two
11. i don't wanna know
12. virginia woolf
13. scooter boys
14. leeds
15. chickenman
16. galileo


17. ??? gone again ??? (mystery song)
18. kid fears
19. closer to fine


the show was excellent.


i think the whole night had a much better general vibe than the
night before.  amy and emily seemed to be a lot more loose and
energetic and there was more audience interaction. they commented
that they'd been sailing ("on a boat.  in the harbour.") that day,
it obviously put them in a good mood.  starting off with a funny
goof in soy (see below) and putting "least complicated" right at
the start of the set list didn't hurt either!


highlights (so many!):
- - in "shame on you", amy forgot to keep playing while emily
        swapped her banjo for a guitar.  amy just sort of stood
        there watching, then suddenly realised there was no music
        happening.  whoops. :)
- - "the wood song" - oh how i love this song...
- - "hey kind friend" - we got to hear this, after amy's forgetting
        how to play this in melbourne last weekend.  (although,
        they did play it in brisbane earlier this week.)  it
        sounded beautiful.  afterwards amy said, "thanks y'all for
        listening so well.  that song can be interminable.  we like
        it, 'cos we feel it.  (emily: "we feel it!")  but, you
        know, it's probably one of those self-indulgent things..."
- - they could not seem to get co-ordinated on the start of "dead
        man's hill".  "we're having different bio-rhythms tonight,"
        said amy, then they just stood there looking at each other.
        emily: "we've been playing together for almost 20 years!"
        so cute (not to mention the little dance thing they did -
        a definite indigo moment)...
- - "shed your skin".  acoustic.  oh, wow.
- - one of the best versions of "power of two" i've ever heard.  when
        it's "on", that song really gives me the warm fuzzies in a
        major way.
- - "chickenman" - especially groovy tonight.  i love the new funky
        thing they're doing at the end of this song.  emily's slide
        guitar adds a whole new groove - it's excellent.
- - the mystery song - no one seems to know what it was (anyone?),
        although i have a feeling i've heard it somewhere before.
        i thought it might be "wild horses" - it wasn't.  it's an
        australian song, i'm fairly certain... amy said emily had
        never heard it before.  if that's true, then she did a heck
        of a job on the solo!  i'll try to find out what the song
        was...
- - "closer to fine" - our very own ian carandang got up on stage to
        sing on this.  (hey ian, you're famous. :)  helped up on
        stage by none other than amy ray herself!  they also got
        simone hardy (the opening act) to sing the last verse.
        she seemed a little overwhelmed but she did pretty well.


all in all i'd say - a superlative concert, i think just about
everybody would agree it was better than the concert on thursday
night.  on thursday i just didn't seem to feel that much of a
connection to other people in the audience, but on friday it was
definitely there.  a great concert, from start to finish.


speaking of finishes, that's the last ig show i'm going to see on
this australian tour.  i just wanted to say that it's been lovely
meeting everyone i met - you're all wonderful (except lynda from
nz, who's more than a little weird haha).  it's been a blast, and
i'm sad it's over... but there's always the next time to look
forward to!  and of course, i'm going road tripping again next
week because of a certain dar williams...


oh - the tape.  it turned out great, except that you can hear me
singing in "kid fears", ctf and a few other songs (oh no!).  hang
tight, it'll be treed or something soon...


happy, happy and happy all over again,
sherlyn
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= sherlyn koo - sherlyn@fl.net.au =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
     "don't ever be afraid to open up your eyes
      so you can see tomorrow..."       - merril bainbridge

- ---------------------------------------------------------------
this has been a message from the ig-news list.
please send feedback, questions etc to owner-ig-news@smoe.org.
submissions are welcome - please send these to ig-news@smoe.org.


------------------------------


date: sun, 01 mar 1998 10:51:31 +1100
from: sherlyn koo <sherlyn@fl.net.au>
subject: [ig-news] ig in the age, feb 20 1998


hey everyone,


the following article appeared in the entertainment guide of
"the age" (one of melbourne's foremost newspapers) on
february 20 1998.


thanks neill!
- -sherlyn

rock of resistance
the indigo girls are folk guitarists who believe music can effect change.
the atlanta duo tell jane rocca why.

the indigo girls inject folk music with up-tempo smothering. since their
formation in 1984, the atlanta duo emily saliers and amy ray have earned a
solid reputation for their stripped-down folk rock. last year, they released
their ninth studio album, 'shaming of the sun', a piquant amalgam of
bouzouki, mandolin, hurdy-gurdy and contemporary folk music fused with
semi-political topics.


in 1989, they released their first album, 'indigo girls', through epic
records. now nine years on, saliers and ray are still winning fans and
record-label support.


constant touring and commitment to each other has proved a winning
combination for saliers and ray. "our friendship is very flexible," says
ray. "we don't live together and we rarely see each other during our time
off. there are moments when one of us doesn't feel sure of our path, but i
mean it's rare. we appreciate what we have."


she says music keeps them motivated: "we love music and i think what
inspires us more than our own music is hearing other people's music. we have
the dedication to not stagnate and so it's given us a certain amount of
consistency. we have the work-ethic thing, we like to work and tour".


the indigo girls do more than play folk music; they raise political
awareness through their song writing and spend months touring to raise money
for various community organisations. "we did a month-long benefit tour
called 'honour the earth' a few months ago in the states, canada and
mexico," says ray. the 21 shows raised more than $300,000.


ray also runs her own record label, daemon records, which released a cd to
accompany the event. it featured artists such as bonnie raitt, soul asylum
and victoria williams.


"art is a form of resistance to the system" she says. "i guess it reflects
what we were taught and about our approach to the community. everybody gives
to each other. we would organise benefits for people in atlanta to (help)
musicians that got sick. we don't really do anything differently to before.
the only thing is that it is much bigger now."


'shaming of the sun' is very personal album for ray, but it received mixed
reviews. "all i know is that for me this record means a lot because we grew
a lot and i feel good about that."


ray admits she doesn't read reviews. "the good ones make me feel good and
the bad ones quite bad. i think the only thing that has bothered us over the
years is the lack of recognition from 'rolling stone' and 'spin magazine'.
when they review the record all they can do is talk about our fan base, our
sexuality but never the music, that is a point of contention sometimes.
that's natural for the ego. i think the main thing is that we have really
counted on touring and word of mouth. in turn, that has triggered a
grass-roots support from fans. we aren't about huge promotion, our
commitment has rewarded us with the fans that we want and that are loyal to
us".

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= sherlyn koo - sherlyn@fl.net.au =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
     "don't ever be afraid to open up your eyes
      so you can see tomorrow..."       - merril bainbridge

- ---------------------------------------------------------------
this has been a message from the ig-news list.
please send feedback, questions etc to owner-ig-news@smoe.org.
submissions are welcome - please send these to ig-news@smoe.org.


------------------------------


date: sun, 1 mar 1998 11:07:54 +0800
from: jodi <joadster@space.net.au>
subject: [ig-news] ig article in the west australian, feb 27, 1998


[sherlyn's note: this message was originally sent to the
indigo girls mailing list at netspace.org.]

wonderful stuff another ig article....with a colour photo...


i type word for word...here goes...


********************************************************************


folk sisters in lore


being politically and socially conscious is second nature to emily saliers.
whether she's talking about it in music or taking time to talk about gay
rights, the singer/songwriter and guitarist says the indigo girls are
activists in their daily lives.


she claims her musical partner amy ray is much more active but saliers
herself has a full dance card. ray runs a small record company and the pair
campaign for indigenous american rights by working with some of the local
communities.


"on one hand it's very emotional and on the other hand it's at it's most
powerful when you see the work they are doing in their own communities,"
saliers says on the phone from her home in the us. "that's as inspirational
as it is emotional."


"mostly our work is in the context of being musicians. i'm particularly
interested in speaking to young gay people and trying to be involved with
related groups as much as possible. you have to be a really gifted writer to
be able to convey what's going on if you have not been there. to be there,
you feel an emotion and that is powerful. and while i write as much as i
feel about something i have never been able to reach that point. i want to
be able to write a song and i creatively fall short. but that's the striving
and it's the best teacher."


the indigo girls have played a big part in lilith fair, the traveling
femme-festival put together by canadian singer sarah mclachlan. as well as
featuring dozens of female artists like jewel, jill sobule, sussannah hoffs,
tracy chapman, suzanne vega, aimee mann, fiona apple and mary
chapin-carpenter, the festival has highlighted numerous women's issues.


"lilith was great," saliers says. "it was like summer camp where everyone
got on really well. we met a lot of wonderful people.


"i do think it's significant and it will remain significant if it keeps
looking at itself and continues to have female artists. they gave away over
$1 million to women's groups, shelters and groups like that and got a lot of
local people to play in different places. i think initially they got a lot
of resistance but that's the human standpoint when something becomes
successful."


saliers and ray are going to perform at the next installment of lilith and
will then take a break before thinking about making another album.


the confessional folk-rockers, playing without a band, will perform at the
(perth) concert hall on wednesday. nestled among the older favourites there
will be a smattering from the duo's latest album, shaming of the sun.
saliers is excited and pleased with how the album has come up live. she
calls it the indigo girls' most accomplished album both in the writing and
in the experimentation.


they produced it themselves and played several different instruments, which
were new to them.


"it was so gratifying and that always feels good," saliers says. "thankfully
the fans like it, too. amy and i were playing around with different
instruments during our live shows before we went to record. there were a lot
of growing pains. some of the songs were really arranged in the studio and
we have never really done that. then it was a different experience going
back out to the fans. ultimately that was a great thing. it helped us take
risks and be more free. i think we are really lucky because our fans are
very accepting and supportive. if we have to fall on our faces in front of
everyone then i'm glad it's our fans. it's difficult when you feel insecure
and you are trying to grow. it's not a comfortable feeling but now it seems
such a long time ago. you have to go through the experience to get to the
other side. there are always lessons you should learn and apply and
sometimes you just don't.


ray wrote some of the album's songs on guitar and others on mandolin while
for saliers writing one on the bouzouki and piano was a big step. shaming of
the sun also contains her first song written with electric guitar. the pair
have always preferred acoustic.


"we had a natural inclination to grow and for me it was getting over a fear
of something new," she says. "it was getting over that and writing songs on
the piano that you can't write on the guitar. for me it's more about the
passion behind the music and it's really emotional music. as long as we
remain honest and write about our perceptions of things and our fans can
hook into it then that's what i know how to do."


so there's little chance, saliers says, that she'll take the plunge into
politics, despite the fact there are increasing numbers of women beginning
to appear in the american congress.


"politics is so nasty. i think i would have a lot of learning to do about
policy making and playing the game. it's all about a successful campaign and
that's more money than substance. i find that disconcerting. it's good there
are still people there for the right reasons."

*********************************************************************


there is also a colour photo, amy sitting indian style , emily sitting with
her knees up....em has a red rage against the machine t-shirt on dressed in
black...and amy has bleached levis on and a black t-shirt, picking at her
big toe. i have seen this photo before somewhere i'm sure.....


ok, i'm done now.


joadster

- ---------------------------------------------------------------
this has been a message from the ig-news list.
please send feedback, questions etc to owner-ig-news@smoe.org.
submissions are welcome - please send these to ig-news@smoe.org.


------------------------------


end of ig-news-digest v1 #9
***************************


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