lifeblood: listlogs: 2004v07n084-news


ig-news-digest          friday, may 21 2004          volume 07 : number 084

today's subjects:
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  [ig-news] posters & stuff           [sherlyn koo <sherlyn@pixelopolis.com>]
  [ig-news] cbs article from march    [sherlyn koo <sherlyn@pixelopolis.com>]
  [ig-news] nwi times article         [sherlyn koo <sherlyn@pixelopolis.com>]

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date: fri, 21 may 2004 13:58:57 +1000
from: sherlyn koo <sherlyn@pixelopolis.com>
subject: [ig-news] posters & stuff

hey folks,

i was just goofing around on the web and found a couple of places
selling merchandise i haven't seen a lot of (note i have no affiliation
with either of these places)...

posters, backstage passes, old concert tickets & stuff here:
http://www.wolfgangsvault.com/catalog.aspx?performingartistid=3040

grateful dead poster from 1991 here:
http://www.posterchild.com/docs/port1.html

and now i should get back to work...

- -sherlyn
- --
sherlyn koo - sherlyn@pixelopolis.com - sydney, australia

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date: fri, 21 may 2004 14:31:26 +1000
from: sherlyn koo <sherlyn@pixelopolis.com>
subject: [ig-news] cbs article from march

hey folks,

i found this article on the cbs web site; it's from their appearance on
the early show this past march.

if you want to read it online it's at
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/03/11/earlyshow/saturday/secondcup/main605505.shtml

- -sherlyn

- ---begin article---
second cup cafi: indigo girls
new york, march 13, 2004

(cbs) back in the 1980s, amy ray and emily saliers got together to
form one of music's most popular folk-rock groups, indigo girls.

for more than 20 years, ray and saliers have been traveling the world
singing their brand of social consciousness. they just released their
ninth studio album, "all that we let in."

of the 11 songs on "all that we let in," six were written by saliers
and five by ray. the pair performed selections from the album on the
early show's second cup cafi.

ray says "perfect world" was inspired by the creation of man-made
lakes. she explains towns, pastures, cemeteries and forests were
flooded to get cheap power and create recreation for people.

"i grew up swimming every weekend in one of those lakes, cutting my
feet on the tops of trees, riding nude with my first girlfriend in a
canoe, dreaming about all the stuff underneath us," she told the
saturday early show in a phone interview. "when i was in my 20s, i
heard about how some indian burial places had once been flooded out
by the tennessee valley authority to make one of these reservoirs.

"this was among many things i learned during my politicization. after
hanging out with indians and activists for a while, i never could see
things straight anymore. the railroad became a symbol of genocide,
the highway a killing field for unsuspecting beasts. we never take
what we need and leave the rest. we just take, and as long as we can
pretend our actions happen in a vacuum, we'll keep doing it."

saliers says "fill it up again "is a song about another relationship
gone sour and trying to find a new path that will replenish what has
been depleted ('you've been the hole in my skin / my shrinking water
supply'). she says it's about patterns of entanglement in bad
relationships ('but in the end it's still a mystery / the placement
of affection and the disarray / the new road is an old friend'), but
the determination to set it right ('fill it up again')."

the women dubbed themselves indigo girls in 1985, and self-released
their debut, "strange fire" in 1987. in 1989, they released their
self-titled album, which won a grammy for best contemporary folk
recording. in the years since, they've played thousands of shows, and
sold millions of records.

ray and saliers are also activists who have done work on behalf of a
number of organizations, including honor the earth, women's action
for new directions and rock the vote.

many singers-songwriters, from ani defranco to sheryl crow, credit
indigo girls with inspiring not just good music, but good ideas in
their own music.

)mmiv, cbs broadcasting inc. all rights reserved.

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date: fri, 21 may 2004 14:47:37 +1000
from: sherlyn koo <sherlyn@pixelopolis.com>
subject: [ig-news] nwi times article

hi folks,

this is absolutely the last one for today... this is from the nwi times
(northern indiana) - you can see it online at

http://www.thetimesonline.com/articles/2004/04/25/features/arts_and_entertainment/33888b495c3d441386256e7d005e9bbc.txt

- -sherlyn

- ---begin article---
defining the power behind the indigo girls

by gary graff
the new york times syndicate

when the indigo girls decided to title their new album "all that we
let in," they were serious about the "all" part.

"there's more to this album," amy ray says. "for the one we made
before this, 'become you' (2002), it was sort of like, 'we're going
to do an acoustic record' -- we were really intentional about that.
then we started to make this one, and it was more like, 'let's not
limit this. let's play whatever seems to be appropriate. let's bring
the songs to a band and really play as a band and work out the
arrangements.'

"i think we just didn't want to make 'become you' again."

truth be told, ray and partner emily saliers have spent almost a
quarter-century trying not to repeat themselves, and they've largely
succeeded.

the georgia duo certainly has a discernible sound, defined by its
melodic, folk-based compositions and its rich vocal harmonies.
acoustic guitar is at the core of the indigo girls' music, but
electric guitars course through the mix as well, alternately
shimmering and grinding as needed.

through the course of 13 albums, ray and saliers have tweaked and
expanded their approach, exploring more textured arrangements and
sparser ones alike while delving into rock, country and world-music
flavors.

"i like to hear things being put on my songs that take them to
another level," the 40-year-old saliers says. "i finish my songs and,
when amy puts her part on it, it makes it a better song. and then the
band makes it better."

ray, who turned 40 on april 12, agrees.

"we do what fits, i guess," she says. "i don't think there's a master
plan or anything. we just keep writing songs, recording them and
figuring out the way they sound best."

the writing part began around 1980, when the two childhood friends,
still in high school, began playing together in suburban atlanta as
saliers & ray. they changed their name to the indigo girls as
students at emory university in atlanta, when they began working the
coffeehouse and student-union circuit.

in 1985 they self-released a single, "crazy game," which led to an
independently released ep and album. they then signed with epic
records for "indigo girls" (1989), which featured guest appearances
by members of r.e.m. and hothouse flowers, as well as the hit "closer
to fine."

at the time, ray says, she had no idea how long the indigo girls
would last, but she isn't complaining.

"yeah," ray says with a laugh, "i'll wake up in the morning and my
feet are creaking like i have arthritis or something, and i think,
'oh my god, i'm still playing with the same person. i can't believe i
have a career that's lasted this long ... '

"i'm always aware of how long we've been together," she says more
seriously. "always. in a good way, too, like 'wow, this is really
special.' it's hard to have a relationship or a business with anybody
for this long. i think we're just lucky."

ray speculates that the key to the longevity of their partnership is
that she and saliers are "very opposite -- our polarity is constantly
challenging us," both musically and personally.

during their long association, she adds, they've learned how to make
that challenge artistically productive while still maintaining a
sense of individuality within the group.

"emily's forgiving and has a lot of integrity, and is willing to look
at the big picture of our relationship as a duo and how to keep it
stable," ray says. "she's really open-minded, and puts up with things
from me that might irritate her, and steps away from it to give
herself a break. and i can do the same thing with her.

"we do spend a lot of time separately," says ray, who in 2001
released a solo album, "stag." "i think, because we write songs
separately, that's kept us intact. i don't think i could write with
her."

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end of ig-news-digest v7 #84
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