lifeblood: listlogs: 2010v12n025-news


ig-news-digest         thursday, july 29 2010         volume 12 : number 025


today's subjects:
-----------------
  [ig-news] cincinnati.com article    [sherlyn koo <sherlyn@pixelopolis.com>]
  [ig-news] emily interview from bay windows  [sherlyn koo <sherlyn@pixelopo]


----------------------------------------------------------------------


date: thu, 29 jul 2010 09:31:53 +1000
from: sherlyn koo <sherlyn@pixelopolis.com>
subject: [ig-news] cincinnati.com article


hey folks,


here's a nice little article from cincinnati.com.  you can read it online
at
http://news.cincinnati.com/article/ab/20100728/ent03/307280090/a-love-fest-in-indigo


cheers,
sherlyn


- ---begin forwarded article---
a love-fest in indigo


by bill thompson - bthompson@enquirer.com - july 28, 2010


how do you measure success? here are two ways to judge the popularity of
the indigo girls in this region this week:


- - when the sold-out crowd of more than 600 people in greaves music hall at
northern kentucky university knew all the words to all of the 23 songs
played tuesday night.


- - when a few hundred folks lined hamilton avenue in northside for an
in-store appearance at shake it records monday night.


emily saliers and amy ray returned the love both nights. the concert was a
reminder of the power of two: two women, two guitars, two otherworldly
voices
singing more than two decades worth of solid songs for about two hours.


the visit to shake it was almost twice as long, as the pair stayed for
more than three hours after their performance to sign autographs and chat
with fans.


"we let 175 people in the store," said darren blase, co-owner of the shop
with his brother jim. "then the line outside went to the end of the block
and around the corner. they stayed for about three hours (after they
played) signing stuff. and they were just as gracious to the last people in
here as they were to the first. it was impressive."


that was the prelude to tuesday's show, which was a benefit for wnku-fm's
25th anniversary.


greaves is a perfect venue for the indigo girls; an intimate space where
their literate lyrics and complicated harmonies came through crystal clear.
the toughest chore of the night for the musicians was whittling the set
list to 23, which forced them to ignore some requests shouted from the
crowd.


but no one could argue with their choices. from "become you" to "sugar
tongue," from "land of canaan" to "the wood song," from "virginia woolf" to
"ozilline," every part of the partners' career was represented. each song,
many of which are on their new live album "staring down the brilliant
dream," seemed to bring a whoop of recognition from a different part of the
building, resonating with different folks for different reasons.


special recognition goes to ray's solo version of mark knopfler's "romeo
and juliet," first covered on "rites of passage" in 1992. almost 20 years
after recording it, she poured just as much passion into the love cry. it
was a remarkable rendering, and brought the audience to its feet.


even though they were preaching to longtime choir members ("we could have
sold out a second show," said chuck miller, the radio station's general
manager, who promised more events in the hall), saliers and ray took
nothing for granted. they faithfully thanked everyone after every song, and
chatted about their visit ("this campus is nice," saliers said at one
point, "in an ayn rand kind of way").


more than 90 minutes after they started, the girls were joined by coyote
grace, the openers whose three members added to the musical and vocal mix
of "gone again," "get out the map" and "ozilline" before saliers turned the
singing duties over to the audience on "galileo."


"y'all ready to sing?" she asked.


absolutely. hundreds of voices filled the room, shouting the praises of
the european scientist as the professionals stood back from their
microphones and smiled.


the scenario was replayed in the encore. after the five players finished
"salty south," it was time for the fans to step up again for the girls'
signature "closer to fine,"
which they were thrilled to do.


it was a fine finish to the two-day love affair.


- -----------------------------------------------------------------
this has been a message from the ig-news list.
please send feedback, questions etc to owner-ig-news@smoe.org.
submissions are welcome - please send these to ig-news@smoe.org.
to unsubscribe send the appropriate command to majordomo@smoe.org:
bounce subscribers:   unsubscribe ig-news
digest subscribers:   unsubscribe ig-news-digest


------------------------------


date: thu, 29 jul 2010 09:37:26 +1000
from: sherlyn koo <sherlyn@pixelopolis.com>
subject: [ig-news] emily interview from bay windows


hi folks,


here's an emily interview from bay windows in new england.  you can read
it online at
http://www.baywindows.com/index.php?ch=arts&sc=music&sc2=news&sc3=&id=108507


cheers,
sherlyn


- ---begin forwarded article---
even closer to fine
by emily cataneo
bay windows contributor
wednesday jul 28, 2010


the indigo girls talk about their new live album, the bp oil spill, and
lgbt rights.

some music critics have posited that emotional female singer-songwriter
music died sometime during the last decade, and has been replaced by
hyper-processed, halloween-costumed pop. in other words, instead of
centering around lyrics and feelings, popular music by women now revolves
around who can pull the craziest antics while wearing the wackiest outfit.


and yet, whatever the current state of pop music, the indigo girls -- who
are practically the poster children for lyrics-centric female folk-rock --
are still, dare we say, closer to fine. more than two decades after their
first album, the activist duo from atlanta are still writing and singing
their hearts out. the two girls, emily saliers and amy ray, recently
released a two-disc live album, "staring down the brilliant dream," and
will appear on their summer tour at the newport sunset music fest on july
29. saliers opened up to bay windows about the new album, lgbt rights, the
bp oil spill, and, of course, that all-important aspect of any musical
act:
the fans.


bw: live albums can be tricky. how did you decide to do one?


es: our fans really liked "1200 curfews," which was our last full-length
live release. we have this group that's been recording shows over the past
three years, and we thought it would be a good time to put out a live
record, because we had all these live recordings at our fingertips. we
knew
that our fans in particular liked live recordings, and we had a lot of
good
recordings.


bw: the new album comes with liner notes that describe your memories from
each of the concerts featured on the album. did compiling those notes
bring
up any old memories, and which were your favorites?


es: oh, different things. on "come on home," [pianist and accordionist]
julie wolf just played incredible piano, and that struck me as an example
of what she brings to us when she tours with us.


basically, each song was chosen because it sounded really good to us, and
it had something special about it. and we worked really hard to make it
something that fans would like. it's cool for the fans who were at the
shows. it's cool as a listener to have been there and now to hear the song
on the album.


bw: the indigo girls have been around for over two decades now. to what do
you attribute your enduring popularity?


es: it's kind of nice for fans that there's amy's music, and then there's
mine. the songs can be different from each other, and you get a broader
experience. we don't write them together, but we put them together.


also, the songs explore issues -- we have traveling music, music that can
be a soundtrack to part of people's lives, and so on. we're exploring
issues like relationships, our relationship to nature, and different
stages
of life. our fans have a real connection to our lyrics.


finally, we make a new set list every night and we try to learn new
instruments. there's a lot of magic to it, and it's hard to pick it apart.
there are a lot of mysterious elements that came together.


bw: turning to the political side of things: how do you view the struggle
for lgbt rights in america today? are you disappointed with president
obama's stance on the issues, or are you optimistic that change is coming?


es: i think obama's got his hands full dealing with a lot of very serious
issues -- war, the oil spill, the economy. what he inherited is pretty
heavy. that's not to discount our struggle, but there's only so far you
can
go with our struggle in the u.s. without committing political suicide. i
think he's a savvy guy and he's behind the queer struggle. some people are
mad at him, but amy and i still like him. i'd rather have him than a lot
of
other people.


i'm impatient, but i'm still optimistic that change will come. i'm
fascinated by the story of the district judge [joseph tauro] who ruled
that
a federal ban on gay marriage is unconstitutional. i think this is how
we'll win the right to marry, through the courts and constitutionality.


but although i see positive change, there are still a lot of issues in the
queer community.


bw: what do you think is the most important issue facing the lgbt
community today?


es: it's a hard question to answer, because all issues are important. i
would say that life or death issues are the most important. when you have
teens or young people who are killing themselves because they've been
oppressed, because they've been crushed.


but i think gay marriage is also extremely important, because it will
spread the seeds for acceptance in time. it's the next great civil rights
movement. people don't have to get married, but they should have the
choice. and my girlfriend is canadian, so immigration laws would be nice.
civil unions are just not enough.


bw: i know you and amy are also really involved in environmental issues.
what do you think about the bp oil spill? do you think it's a much-needed
wake-up call for americans?


es: no, i think there's a lot of stick-your-head-in-the-sand mentality.
this is such a devastating environmental disaster, and even people who can
deal with it are overwhelmed. i mean, i've been so overwhelmed by this
horrible thing that's happened. in the midst of all the work we've had to
do, it's easy to get overwhelmed. and it's so easy to turn on your light
switch and your ac and use your electricity, and to think that there's no
connection between that use of power and how we are destroying the world.
and it's not just america; it's the whole world.


there are options out there -- we have technology, we have brainpower.
it's just that the systematic energy power has been in place for so long.
it can be done, but i don't think that most americans are clued into that.


bw: so what can we expect from your july 29th show in newport?


es: julie wolf will be with us. amy will be playing a few solo songs and
i'm pulling out a few.


also, coyote grace is opening the show, which is significant to the queer
community. joe [the band's guitarist] is female to male, and some of that
content is in the songs. for those who haven't been introduced to
trans-reality, it's nice to get to know them, and aside from that they're
a
great band. people shouldn't miss them.


besides that, we'll be playing a bunch of songs from our discography, and,
of course, having fun!


for more information about the indigo girl's performance in newport, or to
purchase tickets, please visit www.newportwaterfrontevents.com or
www.indigogirls.com.


- --
sherlyn koo - sherlyn@pixelopolis.com - sydney, australia


- -----------------------------------------------------------------
this has been a message from the ig-news list.
please send feedback, questions etc to owner-ig-news@smoe.org.
submissions are welcome - please send these to ig-news@smoe.org.
to unsubscribe send the appropriate command to majordomo@smoe.org:
bounce subscribers:   unsubscribe ig-news
digest subscribers:   unsubscribe ig-news-digest


------------------------------


end of ig-news-digest v12 #25
*****************************ig-news-digest         thursday, july 29 2010         volume 12 : number 025


today's subjects:
-----------------
  [ig-news] cincinnati.com article    [sherlyn koo <sherlyn@pixelopolis.com>]
  [ig-news] emily interview from bay windows  [sherlyn koo <sherlyn@pixelopo]


----------------------------------------------------------------------


date: thu, 29 jul 2010 09:31:53 +1000
from: sherlyn koo <sherlyn@pixelopolis.com>
subject: [ig-news] cincinnati.com article


hey folks,


here's a nice little article from cincinnati.com.  you can read it online
at
http://news.cincinnati.com/article/ab/20100728/ent03/307280090/a-love-fest-in-indigo


cheers,
sherlyn


- ---begin forwarded article---
a love-fest in indigo


by bill thompson - bthompson@enquirer.com - july 28, 2010


how do you measure success? here are two ways to judge the popularity of
the indigo girls in this region this week:


- - when the sold-out crowd of more than 600 people in greaves music hall at
northern kentucky university knew all the words to all of the 23 songs
played tuesday night.


- - when a few hundred folks lined hamilton avenue in northside for an
in-store appearance at shake it records monday night.


emily saliers and amy ray returned the love both nights. the concert was a
reminder of the power of two: two women, two guitars, two otherworldly
voices
singing more than two decades worth of solid songs for about two hours.


the visit to shake it was almost twice as long, as the pair stayed for
more than three hours after their performance to sign autographs and chat
with fans.


"we let 175 people in the store," said darren blase, co-owner of the shop
with his brother jim. "then the line outside went to the end of the block
and around the corner. they stayed for about three hours (after they
played) signing stuff. and they were just as gracious to the last people in
here as they were to the first. it was impressive."


that was the prelude to tuesday's show, which was a benefit for wnku-fm's
25th anniversary.


greaves is a perfect venue for the indigo girls; an intimate space where
their literate lyrics and complicated harmonies came through crystal clear.
the toughest chore of the night for the musicians was whittling the set
list to 23, which forced them to ignore some requests shouted from the
crowd.


but no one could argue with their choices. from "become you" to "sugar
tongue," from "land of canaan" to "the wood song," from "virginia woolf" to
"ozilline," every part of the partners' career was represented. each song,
many of which are on their new live album "staring down the brilliant
dream," seemed to bring a whoop of recognition from a different part of the
building, resonating with different folks for different reasons.


special recognition goes to ray's solo version of mark knopfler's "romeo
and juliet," first covered on "rites of passage" in 1992. almost 20 years
after recording it, she poured just as much passion into the love cry. it
was a remarkable rendering, and brought the audience to its feet.


even though they were preaching to longtime choir members ("we could have
sold out a second show," said chuck miller, the radio station's general
manager, who promised more events in the hall), saliers and ray took
nothing for granted. they faithfully thanked everyone after every song, and
chatted about their visit ("this campus is nice," saliers said at one
point, "in an ayn rand kind of way").


more than 90 minutes after they started, the girls were joined by coyote
grace, the openers whose three members added to the musical and vocal mix
of "gone again," "get out the map" and "ozilline" before saliers turned the
singing duties over to the audience on "galileo."


"y'all ready to sing?" she asked.


absolutely. hundreds of voices filled the room, shouting the praises of
the european scientist as the professionals stood back from their
microphones and smiled.


the scenario was replayed in the encore. after the five players finished
"salty south," it was time for the fans to step up again for the girls'
signature "closer to fine,"
which they were thrilled to do.


it was a fine finish to the two-day love affair.


- -----------------------------------------------------------------
this has been a message from the ig-news list.
please send feedback, questions etc to owner-ig-news@smoe.org.
submissions are welcome - please send these to ig-news@smoe.org.
to unsubscribe send the appropriate command to majordomo@smoe.org:
bounce subscribers:   unsubscribe ig-news
digest subscribers:   unsubscribe ig-news-digest


------------------------------


date: thu, 29 jul 2010 09:37:26 +1000
from: sherlyn koo <sherlyn@pixelopolis.com>
subject: [ig-news] emily interview from bay windows


hi folks,


here's an emily interview from bay windows in new england.  you can read
it online at
http://www.baywindows.com/index.php?ch=arts&sc=music&sc2=news&sc3=&id=108507


cheers,
sherlyn


- ---begin forwarded article---
even closer to fine
by emily cataneo
bay windows contributor
wednesday jul 28, 2010


the indigo girls talk about their new live album, the bp oil spill, and
lgbt rights.

some music critics have posited that emotional female singer-songwriter
music died sometime during the last decade, and has been replaced by
hyper-processed, halloween-costumed pop. in other words, instead of
centering around lyrics and feelings, popular music by women now revolves
around who can pull the craziest antics while wearing the wackiest outfit.


and yet, whatever the current state of pop music, the indigo girls -- who
are practically the poster children for lyrics-centric female folk-rock --
are still, dare we say, closer to fine. more than two decades after their
first album, the activist duo from atlanta are still writing and singing
their hearts out. the two girls, emily saliers and amy ray, recently
released a two-disc live album, "staring down the brilliant dream," and
will appear on their summer tour at the newport sunset music fest on july
29. saliers opened up to bay windows about the new album, lgbt rights, the
bp oil spill, and, of course, that all-important aspect of any musical
act:
the fans.


bw: live albums can be tricky. how did you decide to do one?


es: our fans really liked "1200 curfews," which was our last full-length
live release. we have this group that's been recording shows over the past
three years, and we thought it would be a good time to put out a live
record, because we had all these live recordings at our fingertips. we
knew
that our fans in particular liked live recordings, and we had a lot of
good
recordings.


bw: the new album comes with liner notes that describe your memories from
each of the concerts featured on the album. did compiling those notes
bring
up any old memories, and which were your favorites?


es: oh, different things. on "come on home," [pianist and accordionist]
julie wolf just played incredible piano, and that struck me as an example
of what she brings to us when she tours with us.


basically, each song was chosen because it sounded really good to us, and
it had something special about it. and we worked really hard to make it
something that fans would like. it's cool for the fans who were at the
shows. it's cool as a listener to have been there and now to hear the song
on the album.


bw: the indigo girls have been around for over two decades now. to what do
you attribute your enduring popularity?


es: it's kind of nice for fans that there's amy's music, and then there's
mine. the songs can be different from each other, and you get a broader
experience. we don't write them together, but we put them together.


also, the songs explore issues -- we have traveling music, music that can
be a soundtrack to part of people's lives, and so on. we're exploring
issues like relationships, our relationship to nature, and different
stages
of life. our fans have a real connection to our lyrics.


finally, we make a new set list every night and we try to learn new
instruments. there's a lot of magic to it, and it's hard to pick it apart.
there are a lot of mysterious elements that came together.


bw: turning to the political side of things: how do you view the struggle
for lgbt rights in america today? are you disappointed with president
obama's stance on the issues, or are you optimistic that change is coming?


es: i think obama's got his hands full dealing with a lot of very serious
issues -- war, the oil spill, the economy. what he inherited is pretty
heavy. that's not to discount our struggle, but there's only so far you
can
go with our struggle in the u.s. without committing political suicide. i
think he's a savvy guy and he's behind the queer struggle. some people are
mad at him, but amy and i still like him. i'd rather have him than a lot
of
other people.


i'm impatient, but i'm still optimistic that change will come. i'm
fascinated by the story of the district judge [joseph tauro] who ruled
that
a federal ban on gay marriage is unconstitutional. i think this is how
we'll win the right to marry, through the courts and constitutionality.


but although i see positive change, there are still a lot of issues in the
queer community.


bw: what do you think is the most important issue facing the lgbt
community today?


es: it's a hard question to answer, because all issues are important. i
would say that life or death issues are the most important. when you have
teens or young people who are killing themselves because they've been
oppressed, because they've been crushed.


but i think gay marriage is also extremely important, because it will
spread the seeds for acceptance in time. it's the next great civil rights
movement. people don't have to get married, but they should have the
choice. and my girlfriend is canadian, so immigration laws would be nice.
civil unions are just not enough.


bw: i know you and amy are also really involved in environmental issues.
what do you think about the bp oil spill? do you think it's a much-needed
wake-up call for americans?


es: no, i think there's a lot of stick-your-head-in-the-sand mentality.
this is such a devastating environmental disaster, and even people who can
deal with it are overwhelmed. i mean, i've been so overwhelmed by this
horrible thing that's happened. in the midst of all the work we've had to
do, it's easy to get overwhelmed. and it's so easy to turn on your light
switch and your ac and use your electricity, and to think that there's no
connection between that use of power and how we are destroying the world.
and it's not just america; it's the whole world.


there are options out there -- we have technology, we have brainpower.
it's just that the systematic energy power has been in place for so long.
it can be done, but i don't think that most americans are clued into that.


bw: so what can we expect from your july 29th show in newport?


es: julie wolf will be with us. amy will be playing a few solo songs and
i'm pulling out a few.


also, coyote grace is opening the show, which is significant to the queer
community. joe [the band's guitarist] is female to male, and some of that
content is in the songs. for those who haven't been introduced to
trans-reality, it's nice to get to know them, and aside from that they're
a
great band. people shouldn't miss them.


besides that, we'll be playing a bunch of songs from our discography, and,
of course, having fun!


for more information about the indigo girl's performance in newport, or to
purchase tickets, please visit www.newportwaterfrontevents.com or
www.indigogirls.com.


- --
sherlyn koo - sherlyn@pixelopolis.com - sydney, australia


- -----------------------------------------------------------------
this has been a message from the ig-news list.
please send feedback, questions etc to owner-ig-news@smoe.org.
submissions are welcome - please send these to ig-news@smoe.org.
to unsubscribe send the appropriate command to majordomo@smoe.org:
bounce subscribers:   unsubscribe ig-news
digest subscribers:   unsubscribe ig-news-digest


------------------------------


end of ig-news-digest v12 #25
*****************************


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